Climax or The Beginning?

Dictionary.com (because, 2018), defines Climax in 5 ways:

1. the highest or most intense point in the development or resolution of something; culmination

2.(in a dramatic or literary work) a decisive moment that is of maximum intensity or is a major turning point in a plot.

3. Rhetoric.

  1. a figure consisting of a series of related ideas so arranged that each surpasses the preceding in force or intensity.
  2. the last term or member of this figure.

4. an orgasm.

5Ecology. the stable and self-perpetuating end stage in the ecological succession or evolution of a plant and animal community.

Here, we will explore describing Climax Wood-Fired Whiskey in accordance to the various definitions of the whiskey brand’s namesake.

via Dreamstime

1. Hmmmmmm. I beg to differ here. Upon tasting this whiskey multiple times, in many fashions (freshly cracked open and neat, a few days opened and neat, a few days after opened on the rocks, in a ginger ale and bitters cocktail), I think Climax still has some room for the development of this whiskey in order to achieve it’s highest or most intense point.

This isn’t your ordinary American bourbon style whiskey its Tim Smith’s century-old moonshine recipe aged and filtered with toasted oak and maple wood imparting color and revolutionary flavors. – Climax Spirits

Now hold your horses, I clearly see that this recipe is a century-old, so my initial statement may seem inconsiderate and rude, but I mean what I say in an optimistic way. So let’s get that out the way first: This is a pretty tasty whiskey. It has nice flavors that are familiar in an unfamiliar way which makes it interesting throughout the duration of the sip. The “whiskey feel” is more of a warmth than a burn which can often be attributed to bourbon, which is a pleasant and approachable sensation. What I mean by my stance is I see more for this whiskey. You all know I love my secondary cask finishes so maybe something like that? Maybe, I want a little more ummph…a tad bit of a burn? I’m still trying to figure it out but as is, I can say its enjoyable; sort of like seeing how great your favorite team’s young player could be if they just worked on their jump shot, became a more patient runner, realized they were the fastest on the ice, insert whatever applies – but you get it.

Maybe a fullness? (I’m still trying to get my brain to articulate what my gut is feeling…said everyone ever).

2. Where this whiskey shines is in its turning point in a plot. Refined moonshine anyone? I had never come across Climax brand of booze so when I tasted this Wood-Fired offering, and found it enjoyable, the M.Night Shyamalan reveal came when I read this was more so moonshine than bourbon. Or like whatever parts moonshine getting towards bourbon, or something like that. *Before I go confusing people: moonshine is always unaged but since this one is “aged in oak – 24 hrs” then its still got some remnants right?

Well well well. This got more interesting. From the same featured quote above that stated the century-old recipe (of course I saw this AFTER drinking some), was the detail about said recipe being a moonshine that was then “aged” and filtered to bring it a bourbonness. Hmmmmmm, I do not get the sharp  “I’m swallowing a sword” feeling from this at all! What has Tim Smith done with this recipe here!?

 The final process allows the whiskey to cool in Oak containers and the result is Tim Smith’s revolutionary Climax Whiskey – Made to be in a Class of its Own.” – Climax Spirits

Yea, this was a decisive moment here in my appreciation of the whiskey. I was not expecting to have “consumer moonshine” that didn’t disappoint for being “too soft” – because you drink moonshine to reach the moon – nor did it disappoint for being “wtf is this?”. 

3. I’ll edit this one just a bit: a whiskey consisting of a series of related ideas so arranged that each surpasses the preceding in force or flavor.

Yup, that’s it exactly. What I found to be the championing component for this was the layers of the whiskey that took my senses for a chauffeured ride. The toasted oak route really drove home a marshmallow component that fit the hint of smoke that I picked up. Not intense, expected PEAT, but more along the lines of, just dumped water on the campsite fire 5 minutes ago, type of smoke. More layers (notice I am not merely saying flavors) I traveled across were caramel, vanilla extract (not traditional bourbon vanilla but more of an essence) – wait so creme brulee then, maple syrup, fruit cake, sap like on a pine cone. All of which came one after the other opposed to one taste could be “this or that”. A pretty entertaining drink. Though it was cleverly smooth, with not a burn but more of a warmth, I do wish there was a finish. If anything, there was more of an after taste of the fruit cake, sap, maple syrup than a finish that guided you to the next sip. Possibly due to its youth, which was picked up on the nose as being untamed, I could see how by the end it tired out like a kid getting home after a at the playground. With all of this, the journey fit well within a cocktail where the added ingredients merged all of the layers into a relaxing cohesion. Hope my rhetoric served well.

4. I really have a thing for toasted oak. In my opinion, it just compliments whisk(e)y so well. More of a creaminess from the wood than a dry, grain toughness on the tongue…I realize how this section can be interpreted so that is all I will stop here.

5. As mentioned before, I don’t think this should be the end stage for this offering. I would love to see how a cask strength/barrel proof edition measures up to my thoughts. I definitely would love to see a Sherry or Port or Rum cask finish version as well. All in all, for the price point ranging in the 30-40 USD, you are getting a pretty good every other day whiskey. You got to give just enough time to appreciate this.

Cheers,

Finn


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